Critical Thinking Liberia (CT-L)

Demonstration Meeting

October 15, 2016

WE-CARE Library

Attendance: 23 persons (teachers, school administrators)

Review:

A Look at the Daily Five

    Across Content Areas

  1. Read to self
  2. Read to someone
  3. Listen to reading
  4. Work on words
  5. Work on writing

These are five instructional activities bundle into one, during a class period or learning session. A teacher should provide or create the opportunities for students to read (read to self, read to someone, listen to reading), do activities with words (word study, word knowledge, etc.) as well as do writing activity (expressive/creative pieces) in any subject he or she teaches.

In connection to this concept and in continuation of showing teachers how to make use of the ‘wire books’ (teacher’s edition of reading anthologies) common in their schools, a demo lesson was done using a narrative text (a realistic fiction) called Water Crashes Steel by Nick Ramirez (from the anthology Kaleidescope level C, Units 4-6, SRA McGraw-Hill, 2003; pp 114-117.)

Lesson began with word study, following the steps to teach these sight words: here   there   this    what    our    was

  • Write sight words on board.
  • Read sight words to students. Have them read them back to you.
  • Carefully pronounce words with which students have difficulty.
  • Have students use the words in sentences.

 Participants/students were asked ‘What do you know about boat? How does a boat move or sail?’

Students were also encouraged to think about stories, television shows or movies depicting storms or trouble at sea on a boat or ship.

Reading the story ‘Water Crashes Steel’ was done with stops; the text was divided into 4 portions (3 stops). At every stop there were questions (at diverse levels) to be answered based on what was read, and later a call for prediction (backed by reasons) of what will happen next. Two portions of the reading were done silently (read to self) and the other two were done by one person reading aloud while the others listen or follow along (read to someone; listen to reading).

Here is a summary of the story:

The story is a realistic fiction about a boy and his father’s ordeal at sea. The boy is the narrator of the story. His father is a captain of one of the largest oil tankers in the world. The captain takes his son for a ride on his tanker for the boy’s thirteenth birthday. No sooner trouble strikes. The rudder of the boat breaks and then a mighty storm hits. The tanker sinks gradually but soon help arrives. The father-captain and his son—the birthday boy—are rescued.

Finally, participants/students were asked to do a short piece of writing. In the story, the boy (narrator & lead character) gets a boat trip for his birthday. Facilitator asked participants/students to write a short paragraph describing their most memorable birthday.

Extended Skills (Cross-curriculum approach): Participants (as teachers) were asked to make the science, mathematics, social studies, English grammar, etc. connection to the story/lesson. In other words, they were how they could teach a science or math lesson from the story (using the story) Water Crushes Steel?

RWCT Lesson Delivery Framework

PHASE OF THE LESSON ACTIVITY
 

 

 

 

Anticipation

Word study (teaching sight words):

here   there   this    what    our    was

·         Write sight words on board; read them to students; students read them back to you; carefully pronounce words with which students have difficulty; and  have students use the words in sentences.

Think-pair-share: ‘What do you know about boat? How does a boat move or sail?’

[Tip: Encourage students to think of stories, television shows or movies depicting storms or trouble at sea on a boat or ship. Let them share as well.]

 

 

 

 

Building knowledge

DRTA

The text divided into 4 portions (3 stops). At end of every stop, ask questions (at diverse levels) to be answered based on what was read, and then ask for prediction (backed by reasons) of what will happen next, before reading the next portion.

Two portions should be read silently (read to self) and the other two should be read aloud by one person while the others listen or follow along (read to someone; listen to reading).

 

There should be interaction between/among students and students, just as between students and the teacher.

 

 

Consolidation

Short essay

The boy in the story gets a boat trip for his birthday. Write a short paragraph describing your most memorable birthday.

 

Volunteers share.

 

Meeting Facilitated by: M. Woryonwon Roberts